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Ludic Language Pedagogy: How to teach with any game in your language classroom

Page history last edited by James York 2 years, 1 month ago Saved with comment

Session Title: 

Ludic Language Pedagogy: How to teach with any game in your language classroom

 


 

 

Logo: 

 

 


 

 

Abstract:  

In this session, participants will consider their LUDIC, LANGUAGE, and PEDAGOGICAL (LLP) literacies. Moderators will show how we are teaching with games, providing frameworks, worksheets, and other materials including examples of student work. Teachers will also design their own lesson plans under the feedback and guidance of moderators.

 


 

Target audience

 

  • Boots on the ground” language teachers (Jones, 2019) at any grade level. Kindergarten to university and beyond. Anyone can become an LLPeer.

 

We mean this sincerely. We want to help teachers who either 1) already have the freedom to experiment with games in their context or 2) are willing to make space to experiment with games in their contexts. Don’t worry, we’re here to help you figure this out!

 

  • Researchers who are interested in seeing what “ludic language pedagogy” looks like.

 

The LLP Journal mission is to create an inclusive and diverse avenue of research that focuses on teachers (their roles, choices, mediation, etc.) and pedagogy. In this course, we hope to inspire teachers and researchers to help us pioneer, develop and evidence the effectiveness of good teaching with games and the field of Ludic Language Pedagogy.

 

Jones, D. M. (2020). Games in the language learning classroom: Is the juice worth the squeeze? Ludic Language Pedagogy, 2, 1-36.

York, J. (2019). “Kotoba Rollers” walkthrough: Board games, TBLT, and player progression in a university EFL classroom. Ludic Language Pedagogy, 1, 58-114.

 


 

Session objectives: 

This session focuses on the practical application of teaching with games and playful activities.

 

By the end of this session, participants will have...

 

  • A greater understanding of all sorts of games and playful activities.

  • Knowledge of how they can implement various games (conversation, board, card, digital) to meet their curricular goals.

  • A personally designed lesson plan to implement in their context.

 

We will give teachers a range of materials including teaching frameworks, syllabi, worksheets, and lesson plans from our own teaching experiences.

 

Examples include:

 

  • Discussion worksheets

  • Grading rubrics

  • Self-reflection diary worksheets

  • Simplified game rulebooks

  • "How to" guides

  • YouTube viewing and vocabulary mining guide

 

Moderators will work with attendees throughout. We will help you consider your current teaching context, how much freedom you have to play, and then finally work together with you to use and remix our materials, combining them to build lesson plans that you can use in your context.

 


  

Syllabus:

The session syllabus. Include the major focus for each week and at least one activity or task. You will fill in the details during the training session.

 

Week 1: Introduction to the course

  • What will teachers learn and create?
  • What does “ludic” mean and what do we mean by Ludic Language Pedagogy?
  • Introduction to tools
  • Create your own “player worksheet”

 Week 2: All about pedagogy

  • Think about your own context and fill in your “character sheet.” 
  • How can we teach languages? What makes your LLP go “MMM?” (methods, materials, mediation)
  • What choices do teachers have? How do teachers influence learners? What can we do to promote learning? Autonomy? Interest?

 Week 3: All about games and play

  • WHAT games or playful activities could we use?
  • What are the various layers of interaction/language learning potential of games (within, around, ecological)
  • Choose a game. How could it be utilized to teach languages?

Week 4: All about language

  • Level 1
    • Reading, writing, listening, speaking
    • Grammar
    • Vocabulary (Thinking Deeply: Worksheet)
    • Common standards (CEFR, ACTFL)
  • Level 2
    • Literacy skills 
    • Text analysis (Author, Audience, Organization, Purpose, etc) Worksheet
    • Cyberpragmatics (internet communities: slang, memes, in-jokes)
    • Gaming cultures and language use

Week 5: Putting it all together (designing a lesson plan)

  • Consider all of the lesson plans in the “one game, many approaches” paper.
  • Design your lesson plan
  • Reflection: Think about your own context and fill in our “character sheet” again. 

 


  

Week 1: (January 10 - 16)

 

  • Meet the moderators
  • What will teachers learn and create in this course?
    • Introduction to the course
    • Why even consider teaching with games?

    • Overview of the course, including a “player worksheet” which will be completed each week

    • What will you learn?

  • Introductions to each other
    • Self-intros and getting to know each other including context, students and goals

  • What does “ludic” mean, and what do we mean by “Ludic Language Pedagogy?”
  • Play and discuss a game: “Spyfall”
  • Introduction to tools
    • Discord

      • For sharing work, asynchronous discussion, and synchronous sessions

    • Google docs

      • For creating your lesson plans, and other materials.

  • Create your own “player worksheet” 

 


 

 

Week 2: (January 17 - 23) All about pedagogy!

 

We start the course by thinking about what it means to be a good teacher. 

  • Think about your own context and fill in your “character sheet.” 

  • How can we teach languages? What makes your LLP go “MMM?” (methods, materials, mediation)

  • Can “one game rule them all?” 

    • Look at how different methods and the same game create wildly different lesson plans (which you can use!)

  • What choices do teachers have? 

    • How do teachers influence learners?

    • What can we do to promote learning? Autonomy? Interest?

 

Suggested Reading

York, J., Poole, F. & deHaan, J. (forthcoming) Playing a new game - An argument for a teacher-focused field around games and play in language education (can be read here)

Aguilar, S. J., Holman, C., & Fishman, B. J. (2018). Game-Inspired Design: Empirical Evidence in Support of Gameful Learning Environments. Games and Culture, 13(1), 44–70. https://doi.org/10.1177/1555412015600305 


 

 

Week 3: (January 24 - 30) All about games and play!

 

In this week of the course, participants will consider the following questions:

  • WHAT games or playful activities could we use?

  • What are the various layers of interaction/language learning potential of games (within, around, ecological)

  • Choose a game. How could it be utilized to teach languages?

 

Suggested Reading

York, J. (2020). How to teach languages with “Among Us.” Ludic Language Pedagogy, 2, 269-283. (https://llpjournal.org/2020/10/25/j-york-how-to-teach-languages-with-among-us.html

deHaan, J. (2020a). Jidoukan Jenga: Teaching English through remixing games and game rules. Ludic Language Pedagogy, 2, 37-40.

deHaan, J. (2020). 10 great classroom activities language teachers can do with games (in addition to helping students speak while playing!). Ludic Language Pedagogy, 2, 70-74. https://llpjournal.org/2020/05/08/dehaan-10-great-activities.html 

 


 

 

Week 4: (January 31 - February 6): All about language!

 

 

Suggested Reading

deHaan, J. (2020). 10 great classroom activities language teachers can do with games (in addition to helping students speak while playing!). Ludic Language Pedagogy, 2, 70-74.

deHaan, J. (2019). Teaching language and literacy with games: What? How? Why? Ludic Language Pedagogy, 1, 1-57.

 

 


 

 

Week 5: (February 7 - 13): Putting it all together!

In this week of the course, and via async sessions with moderators, participants will work either individually or together in small groups to design a lesson plan that they can take away and use in their teaching context.

 

  • Consider all of the lesson plans in the “one game, many approaches” paper.

    • What are the pros and cons of each?

    • Which suits your teaching style?

    • Do you have the freedom to play?

    • How could you remix them for your own context?

  • Design your lesson plan

    • Consider the who, what, where, why, how, Methods, Materials, Mediation, etc.

    • Draft, get feedback from moderators

    • Pose questions in the community Discord

    • Revise and present (via a “game jam”)

  • Reflection: Think about your own context and fill in our “character sheet” again.

    • What did you learn by doing this course?

      • Games and play

      • Your students

      • Your context

      • How to teach

 

  

Suggested Reading

Spano, F., York, J., deHaan, J., & Bard, R. (in review) One game, many approaches: How teachers can use a single game with any teaching methodology, Ludic Language Pedagogy, 3. Preview here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1U8XcW_iYzTuDGXBIx7OnFhodDQSg4THfABnlD1AXeC0/edit#

 

 


 

 

How to Join our course

Registration starts on Jan 3, 2021. 

We use Discord and Google Docs as the core tools of this course.

Everything will be shared with you through this single communication platform.

You can access the LLP Discord with the following "How to" guide:

Easy mode

We have an interactive guide on how to join the LLP Discord which you can find here:

https://view.genial.ly/617fd3a11766240db0aa59d1

 


 

Suggested sponsor(s): 

 

 

Moderators: 

 

 

Name (last, first)

Email address

Location 

(country of residence)

Biodata 

(max. 50 words)

Photo

YORK James

jamesyorkjp@gmail.com

Japan

James conducts research on the application of games in language teaching. He is currently exploring research on the following areas:


The use of tabletop games in a TBLT curriculum.

A multiliteracies-inspired curriculum using Reddit as a platform for participation in English speaking communities.

The affordances of VR, AR and Interactive Fiction for language learning (more details)

James also edits Ludic Language Pedagogy, an open-access journal which publishes research on the integration of games and play into language teaching practices.

DEHAAN, Jonathan

dehaan.shizuoka@gmail.com

Japan

I teach and research language and literacy with games and play. (all kinds of games|all kinds of play)

I use the "Pedagogy of Multiliteracies" in my work. My students and I:

- think about who we are and who we want to become

- we choose appropriate games, play them, discuss them, and research social/cultural connections

- then use our experiences and knowledge to create a participatory project that bridges to future personal, public and professional aspects of ourselves.

Co-editor of Ludic Language Pedagogy.

BARD, Rose

rosebard@gmail.com

Brazil

Rose is an educational designer and EFL teacher with a B.A. in Education and a n MSc in ICT applied in education. She has  collaborated in various initiatives online and been integrating digital technologies in in-person  courses since 2008. She has been running MineAcademy English Club and teaching with Minecraft since 2020 remotely by applying TBLT and Project-based learning. Her current research focus is on best practices for  teaching YLs online, especially when implementing immersive ludic environments and games.

SWAYNE, River

riverjpstudent@gmail.com

America

Junior LLPer and student of “Kotoba Miners,” a Ludic Japanese class utilizing Minecraft. “James’ assistant”.

KASHITSYN, Kathryn 

 

carrygan1990@gmail.com  Russia Kathryn is an ESL/EFL teacher with over 12 years of experience in education and holds B.A. in Linguistics. Since 2015 she has been self-employed which provided her with an opportunity to join global educational projects and develop her own courses for different age groups of English learners. Her journey with Minecraft started in 2017 when she launched a summer club for YLs. Since then she has been uninterruptedly creating materials, worksheets, teacher's guides for Minecraft in education basing on principles of CLIL, PBL, TBL and GBL. Kathryn Kashitsyn

 

Primary Contact:

The primary contact is responsible for getting all moderators into the training session, and for communicating deadlines, special events like our live webcasts, and other information to moderators.

 

James York

jamesyorkjp@gmail.com

Cheapshot#0001 on Discord

@cheapshot on Twitter

 


 

 

Acknowledgement

By allowing your name to be put forward as co-moderator of this session, you acknowledge the following:

 

  • I understand that session first-time moderators are required and returning moderators are encouraged to participate in the 5-week Moderators' Development Session from October 18 until November 15, 2021.

  • I am available to actively engage in the EVO session I have agreed to co-moderate between January 9 and February 14, 2021. 

  • I further understand that 

    • EVO sessions are free of advertising and commercial sponsorship.

    • EVO sessions are free and open to all

    • No academic credit may be given for participation.

 

James York

Rose Bard

River Swayne

Kathryn Kashitsyn

Jonathan deHaan

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